Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are a global crisis.  Recognizing the rapid growth in cases of infection like MRSA and ventilator-associated pneumonia being picked up in hospitals, Kimblery-Clark Healthcare has put together a website called “Not on My Watch” at www.haiwatch.com to educate patients and healthcare professionals.  Their goal is to eliminate these preventable illnesses and their often tragic consequences.


While politicians and lobbyists argue about who gets health care and who pays for it, people still get sick. An increasingly restless, assertive and sophisticated group of internet-enabled e-patients, is taking matters into their own hands and becoming equal partners with, if not the primary drivers of the medical profession in managing their own health.

Los Altos, CA (PRWEB) October 6, 2009 — As President Obama rallied doctors in the Rose Garden, Professor Clayton Christensen, of Harvard Business School and author of The Innovator’s Prescription, called for patients to discard their roles as passive health care consumers and become agents of disruptive change in the current issue of Atlantic magazine.

These e-patients now have a powerful new tool for online health search and personalized medicine at www.ResoundingHealth.com — a new environment that combines a powerful, knowledge-intensive vertical search engine and database with the ability of consumers to customize it for their own needs and then easily share their search results with others, including their health care providers.
Our goal is to technologically enable participatory, personalized medicine.
Resounding Health was co-founded by Harvard Medical School Professor and former pharmaceutical company executive Dr. Mark Boguski and seasoned Silicon Valley developer and entrepreneur Dr. Alan Littleford. “Our mission is to empower the e-patient” says Littleford. Also, Boguski added, “Our goal is to technologically enable participatory, personalized medicine.”

A unique feature of Resounding Health are Casebooks, free e-books that contain essential information from authoritative sources in a convenient package that users can create, build upon, link to, print and share with their doctors, caregivers and others. According to Littleford, future releases of Resounding Health will enable users to link their online search results to their personally-controlled electronic medical records or EMRs.

A sampling of recent Casebooks on various medical conditions and drugs shows the diversity of topics covered: addiction, alternative medicine, autism and Asperger’s syndrome, brain tumors, breast cancer, diabetes, drug intoxication, herniated discs, Hodgkin’s disease, leukemia, medical tourism, mercury poisoning, liver transplants, lupus, pancreatic cancer, seizures, stem cell transplants, stress fractures and stroke.

For additional information including video tutorials, or to create your own Casebooks, visit www.ResoundingHealth.com. This web site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from a health care professional. The information is not to be used for self-diagnosis or treatment. Resounding Health™ and empowering the e-Patient™ are trademarks of Resounding Health Incorporated. New Casebooks can be followed on Twitter @ResoundHealth

About ResoundingHealth.com:
Resounding Health Incorporated was co-founded by Mark Boguski, M.D. and Alan Littleford, Ph.D. Dr. Boguski has held positions at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, the U.S. National Institutes of Health, the U.S. National Library of Medicine and as an executive in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. He is a former vice president of Novartis and was honored as a Visionary and Influencer by the Personalized Medicine Coalition in 2006. Dr. Boguski was elected to both the Institute of Medicine of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences the American College of Medical Informatics in 2001. He is currently on the faculty of Harvard at the Francis Countway Library of Medicine and at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. Dr. Littleford was the co-Founder and Chief Technology Officer of Healthscape, Inc. Prior to this, he held a number of key positions in the IT industry as Principal Architect, Lead Developer or Founder at companies such as Cogent Software, Sitka (a subsidiary of Sun Microsystems), Siebel Systems and Network Associates. Littleford has also served as a highly sought-after consultant for a number of both major companies and technology start-ups.

###


DALLAS — Sept. 14, 2009 — Blame your brain for sabotaging your efforts to get back on track after splurging on an extra scoop of ice cream or that second burger during Friday night’s football game.

Findings from a new UT Southwestern Medical Center study suggest that fat from certain foods we eat makes its way to the brain. Once there, the fat molecules cause the brain to send messages to the body’s cells, warning them to ignore the appetite-suppressing signals from leptin and insulin, hormones involved in weight regulation.

The researchers also found that one particular type of fat — palmitic acid — is particularly effective at instigating this mechanism.

Dr. Deborah Clegg and colleagues suggest that fat molecules from certain foods can change brain chemistry in a very short period, causing appetite-suppressing signals to be ignored.

“Normally, our body is primed to say when we’ve had enough, but that doesn’t always happen when we’re eating something good,” said Dr. Deborah Clegg, assistant professor of internal medicine at UT Southwestern and senior author of the rodent study appearing in the September issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation.

“What we’ve shown in this study is that someone’s entire brain chemistry can change in a very short period of time. Our findings suggest that when you eat something high in fat, your brain gets ‘hit’ with the fatty acids, and you become resistant to insulin and leptin,” Dr. Clegg said. “Since you’re not being told by the brain to stop eating, you overeat.”

Dr. Clegg said that in the animals, the effect lasts about three days, potentially explaining why many people who splurge on Friday or Saturday say they’re hungrier than normal on Monday.

Though scientists have known that eating a high-fat diet can cause insulin resistance, little has been known about the mechanism that triggers this resistance or whether specific types of fat are more likely to cause increased insulin resistance. Dr. Clegg said she suspected the brain might play a role because it incorporates some of the fat we eat — whether it is from healthy oils or the not-so-healthy saturated fat found in butter and beef — into its structure.

Based on this suspicion, her team attempted to isolate the effects of fat on the animals’ brains. Researchers did this by exposing the animals to fat in different ways: by injecting various types of fat directly into the brain, infusing fat through the carotid artery or feeding the animals through a stomach tube three times a day. The animals received the same amount of calories and fat; only the type of fat differed. The types included palmitic acid, monounsaturated fatty acid and oleic acid.

Palmitic acid is a common saturated fatty acid occurring in foods such as butter, cheese, milk and beef. Oleic acid, on the other hand, is one of the most common unsaturated fatty acids. Olive and grapeseed oils are rich in oleic acid.

“We found that the palmitic acid specifically reduced the ability of leptin and insulin to activate their intracellular signaling cascades,” Dr. Clegg said. “The oleic fat did not do this. The action was very specific to palmitic acid, which is very high in foods that are rich in saturated-fat.”

Dr. Clegg said that even though the findings are in animals, they reinforce the common dietary recommendation that individuals limit their saturated fat intake. “It causes you to eat more,” she said.

The other key finding, she said, is that this mechanism is triggered in the brain — long before there might be signs of obesity anywhere else in the body.

The next step, Dr. Clegg said, is to determine how long it takes to reverse completely the effects of short-term exposure to high-fat food.

Other UT Southwestern researchers involved in the study included Dr. Carol Elias, assistant professor of internal medicine, and Drs. Boman Irani and William Holland, postdoctoral research fellows in internal medicine. Researchers from the University of Cincinnati, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and the University of Paris also contributed to the study.

The study was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

Visit www.utsouthwestern.org/nutrition to learn more about clinical services in nutrition at UT Southwestern, including treatments for diabetes, kidney disease and obesity.

###

Media Contact: Kristen Holland Shear
214-648-3404
kristen.hollandshear@utsouthwestern.edu